Chrysanthemum Exhibit at Sankeien

Autumn's flower and the Imperial Seal of Japan

Oct 26
Nov 24
Venue: Sankeien Garden When: Oct 26th - Nov 24th 2019 , 9:00am - 5:00pm

Did you know that the Imperial Seal of Japan is a Chrysanthemum? The seal features 16 petals with another set of 16 petal tips behind it. It can be seen on official documents, such as a passport, and represents longevity & rejuvenation.

Known as “Kiku” in Japanese, the Chrysanthemum is also the symbol for Autumn. The spacious Sankeien Garden in Yokohama holds a Chrysanthemum Flower Exhibition annually. Now through November 24th, admire the flowers that are grown into unusual shapes by prescribed methods of care and pruning, similar to the Bonsai. In addition to the hundreds of Chrysanthemum blooms, beautiful Bonsai arrangements are also on display.

Here is a list of styles and shapes of Chrysanthemums on exhibit:

  • Oogiku - Big flower
  • Kogiku Bonsai - Small flowers Bonsai
  • Kengai - Cascade style
  • Kotengiku - Classic flower
  • Edogiku - Edo flower

Sankeien Garden is comprised of an inner and outer garden with scenery that changes every season. View the Event Calendar for more details. Admission is 500yen for Adults, 200yen for Children. Parking up to 2-hours is available for 500yen.

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Jessica A Paje

Jessica A Paje @jessica.paje

Originally from San Diego, California, I lived in Japan for 4-1/2 years and now I am currently based out of Honolulu, Hawaii. In December 2010, I arrived in Yokosuka with a new outlook on my future. Mainly, to refocus on family and let my curiosities take us to places we’ve only dreamt of. Along the way, we’d hopefully develop new friendships and simply collect memories to last a lifetime. Then, there was the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. I will never forget that experience and the devastating effects it had on the entire country. I asked the community, “What can I do to help?” Collecting, sorting, and packing donations, was the least I could do. I also ended up going back to California for one month, raised a small monetary donation for Red Cross, and secured a few phone interviews to help spread the word on how others from the United States could assist. I was determined to show my family, friends, and folks across the world that it would be okay to return to Japan. After all, I wanted them to know that all of the little things that make up this beautiful country still existed. What better way than to use a platform such as JapanTravel.com to share photos and stories full of life, history, and culture. It is a pleasure to say I have contributed more than 150 articles to a database that now collectively holds more than 15,000! This journey has not only allowed me to realize my initial goals, but I’d like to think that it has somehow played a role in sparking an interest locally and across the globe for others to experience all that is published here and more. I invite you to also share your wonderful stories, offer comments, and ask questions right here on JapanTravel. Feel free to contact me at jessica.paje@japantravel.com. Safe travels! ٩( ๑╹ ꇴ╹)۶

Join the discussion

Elena Lisina 3 days ago
Wonderful flowers and shots, Jessica!
Sherilyn Siy 2 weeks ago
Didn't know there were flowers with two colors!
Kim B 3 weeks ago
Such beautiful flowers!